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See how a top designer and copy writer redesign the CannyBill website

Posted on by Clive Walker in News Web Design

Have you ever wanted to get more insight into the thinking behind a website redesign? I know I have. Well, there's an interesting open design process happening at the moment with the redesign of the CannyBill website. Andy Clarke is redesigning the website with the help of Relly Annett-Baker who is rewriting the copy … and they are describing each step of the process. There have been several posts already including this one about redesigning the home page and another about how Andy organises his files.

These posts provide great insight into the thinking behind the redesign and it's not often that you get this. I'll definitely be following along over the next few days/weeks!

Twitter: Follow Andy Clarke and Relly Annett-Baker on Twitter to get their latest updates on the process (and their other tweets).

Comments

  • 21 Oct 2009 09:25:30

    This is a nice in-depth view on the design process and a professional approach to laying out a design piece by piece! I liked the original CannyBill design but after reading the comments on the site I can see where the design needed to be amended.

    I particular thought the usage of a two colour swatch, simply using different hues on these two colours was worth noting, as these were picked before the design process began. Also the idea of working in black and white to perfect the layout seemed a novel but useful idea, so as not to get distracted by the colour. This can be a key downfall where designing sites, looking at the colour more than the layout (which is obviously key to the sites success).

    I’ll be following this blog further to see how the final design pans out. Andy Clarkes work method is something we can all take a few hints from.

  • 21 Oct 2009 09:56:29

    @Stephen: The latest post has some fantastic advanced CSS usage. Lots of new stuff to think about.

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