A personal project

Posted in on 11 August 2012 | Comments

I like to run a few personal websites and really enjoy writing articles for these. The articles are not about web-related technical stuff but describe things I get up to in my spare time. I guess this is a bit of a ‘diversion’ for me and one way to get away from my 9-to-5 job as a freelance web developer/designer.

One of these websites is Clive Goes Cycling

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What do you do with old websites and domains?

Posted in on 8 July 2012 | Comments

I’ve bought quite a few domain names in the last ten years and also created websites on many of them. Some of these have been personal projects where I had an idea for making millions on the Internet (like we all have) but, no surprise, they failed in that respect. I’ve made some pocket money with Google Adsense on a few of them so that’s been good but I won’t be retiring from my day job as a web designer/developer any time soon.

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Making it easy to read more

Posted in on 13 June 2012 | Comments

One thing that I’ve found difficult recently is reading interesting articles outside of my usual working hours. So, I’ve been looking round for apps/websites that would make reading easier for me. That’s when I discovered Readability which is a website that makes it easy to convert any web page into a clean, distraction-free, reading view. You can also save articles for later with a browser plug-in and sync the reading list across all of your devices. It works great!

At the Port80 Web Design Conference

Posted in on 28 May 2012 | Comments [2]

Last week I went to the Port 80 Web Design Conference (Twitter) in Newport. The conference was organised by Joel Hughes who wanted to have a web design conference in South Wales. Great credit to him for deciding to do something like this – and then doing it! Here’s my take on the conference.

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How to show and hide content areas with Perch CMS

Posted in on 7 May 2012 | Comments [2]

Perch is a lightweight CMS that I’ve used quite a lot recently. You can build a website in the normal way and then assign areas or sections of HTML to the Perch system via templates (snippets of HTML containing Perch tags). Additionally, the admin control panel seems to be easily understood by clients. It all works great!

Even though Perch is a lightweight system, it can still be pretty powerful because you can share content areas between pages and also hide or show content quite easily. This is all explained in the Perch documentation but the ability to hide or show content areas is something that is a bit ‘underplayed’ (or perhaps I only discovered this after everybody else) so I thought I’d highlight it.

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